Feed Delivery Trucks Should be Subject to PEDV Monitoring

Feed Delivery Trucks Should be Subject to PEDV Monitoring

Review biosecurity standards for feed delivery trucks on your farm to prevent spread of Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea virus

Pork producers should take extra precautions with feed and delivery trucks to prevent the spread of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus, says Marcia Shannon, University of Missouri Extension swine nutrition specialist.

PEDV spreads through contact with contaminated feces, and the virus appears to survive in manure for a long time, especially in cold weather. That's why a review of biosecurity measures when getting feed at the local feed mill or having a feed truck deliver feed to the farm are crucial, says veterinarian Dr. Stephen Patterson.

Having a plan in place lessens the chance that trucks, bagged feed, equipment, clothing and footwear become contaminated with fecal material.

KEEPING CLEAN: Feed trucks are one point of entry for PEDV. Both farmer and feed truck delivery driver should take precautions to reduce the risk of spreading PEDV from farm to farm.

Patterson recommends the following tips:
• Keep the delivery truck and trailer clean. Wash and disinfect wheels, tires and fender walls before or after each farm visit. Let the truck and trailer dry for best results.

• Wash and disinfect floor mats when you wash the truck.

• Use disinfectant wipes to clean the steering wheel, armrests, gearshift, door handles and any other areas that can be contaminated. Use aerosol disinfectant on seats.

• Before exiting a truck, drivers should put on clean, disinfected boots or shoes before hitting the ground.

Related: Pork Farmers Reiterate Optimism in Spite of PEDv

Follow these rules wherever you go, such as the gas station, grocery store, restaurants, post office and other public buildings. Follow the same procedures when you get back in the vehicle. Limit travel or the number of stops as much as possible.

For more information about PEDV, go to the website of the American Association of Swine Veterinarians.

Source: University of Missouri Extension

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish