USDA Appoints 16 Directors To United Soybean Board

USDA Appoints 16 Directors To United Soybean Board

Ten returning directors and six new appointees will be sworn in at USB's annual meeting

Sixteen farmer-leaders will be sworn in as directors of the United Soybean Board in December, after their recent appointments by U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack.

The 16 soybean farmers from across the United States include six new appointees and 10 returning directors. These volunteer farmers invest soy checkoff funds on behalf of all U.S. soybean farmers in projects to increase the value of U.S. soy meal and oil; ensure U.S. farmers and their customers maintain the freedom and infrastructure to operate; and meet the needs of U.S. soy's customers.

Ten returning directors and six new appointees will be sworn in at annual meeting

"We look forward to welcoming the new and returning directors to our board," says USB Chair Vanessa Kummer, a soybean farmer from Colfax, N.D. "We are confident they, like the others on the board, are committed to leveraging checkoff dollars for projects that maximize the profit potential of all U.S. soybean farmers."

Appointed farmer-leaders include ( * indicates returning director):

James H. Carroll III, Arkansas*; Todd A. Gibson, Missouri*; Walter L. Godwin, Georgia ; Mark Caspers, Nebraska*; David P. Hartke, Illinois*; Morris L. Shambley, North Carolina; Mark A. Seib, Indiana ; Jay M. Myers, North Dakota; Laura L. Foell, Iowa*; John B. Motter, Ohio*; Dennis R. Clark, Kentucky*; Jim Musser, Pennsylvania*; cRaymond S. Schexnayder Jr., Louisiana*; David G. Iverson, South Dakota; James A. Call, Minnesota*; Robert W. White Jr., Virginia.

All appointees will serve three-year terms, beginning Dec. 6, when they'll be sworn in at USB's annual meeting in St. Louis. Qualified State Soybean Boards nominated all of the appointees.

The 69 farmer-directors of USB will oversee the investments of the soy checkoff and leverage those funds to increase the value of U.S. soy meal and oil, to ensure U.S. soybean farmers and their customers have the freedom and infrastructure to operate, and to meet the needs of U.S. soy's customers.

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